Fulfillment Unpostponed: Reflections on the Love of the Now

What nonsense keeps the mind buzzing in shallow activity! When we set aside its crippling inhibitions for a moment, we fall into a deep openness to what is, to reality as it is, not as we wish it to be. And in this opening up, there is a deep, deep peace and a love that comes pouring out. It is a love that reaches out to all and excludes none, a love with no ‘self’ in mind, no interests to perpetuate.

It is a love without conditions, that loves all not “if” it becomes a certain way, but because it is as it is now. It is cosmic and includes all. And when we are swept up in it, we find we fulfill the world and are ourselves fulfilled, for the two are part of the same continuous unfolding of being in the present moment of manifestation. We realize and are realized in the beauty of the now, whatever it contains.

This love and peace are intrinsically liberation; when we are in the grips of this love, there is no restriction.  There is no sense of limitation, of postponing joy in our being until we lose a certain arbitrary number of pounds, or become more muscular, or make more money.  There is simply a love.  It is the love that we yearned for from the moment we burst on to the scene of the world in our most deep and primitive need to love and be loved.

The tragic irony of life is that this love is always here in the present moment; we need only look past our shallow mental preoccupations to experience it.  What can take us past these preoccupations? A few drinks of alcohol with friends, a walk in the park, a meditation session, a hug from a friend, a kiss from a loved one, and countless other things.  Anything that opens us up and eases us into letting go accomplishes this beautiful gesture, this wellspring of revelation of what is always there within us.

When we open up into acceptance, we find serenity.  When we open up beyond placing limits on life, limits on happiness, limits on satisfaction, we open up onto the love of the now.  This is a mystical love in Wittgenstein’s sense, a love for the fact that there is a universe at all, however imperfect  it may be.  It is a love that finds perfection in the imperfect, the absolute in the relative.  It is the supreme fulfillment for which we all yearn, the love of the now, which is always here.

When we let go and are still and quiet, we reach deep into its essence and are transformed by the encounter that ensues.  In this moment, we are “still and know that I am God” (Psalm 46:10).  We find our bliss in the now, whatever it contains, whatever it may be.  And in this bliss, we are fulfilled beyond what words can express, beyond what thought can think and imagination can imagine.

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3 thoughts on “Fulfillment Unpostponed: Reflections on the Love of the Now

  1. I really like your work, but you look so young. You ideas can’t be up to par with real philosophers. You postulate some interesting ideas.They lack a cohesive structure in your texts. Sometimes it’s hard to follow and other times your too verbose, s’sauce my espanole.
    I wish you would understand the important things philosophers must do to perverse their integration of ideas and emotionally.
    By the way I like the pleasure of having read you.
    As Ignatius said:
    “”Remember for just one minute of the day, it would be best to try looking upon yourself more as God does, for She knows your true royal nature.””

    -Melini

  2. “You ideas can’t be up to par with real philosophers.”

    What is a “real philosopher” according to you? Why don’t I qualify as one?

    “They lack a cohesive structure in your texts.”

    There are many styles of philosophizing. I like philosophical fragments; in that sense, I am more of a Kierkegaard than a Hegel. I also believe in speaking the truth of today “in words as hard as cannonballs and to do the same tomorrow, even if it contradicts everything you said today” (Emerson) as clearly as one can conceive of it; in this sense, I am more of an Emerson than a Descartes.

    “Sometimes it’s hard to follow and other times your too verbose”

    This is a fair criticism. I’ve been working on the writing aspect of my blogs lately; my goal is not to impress, but to express, not to exaggerate, but to communicate.

    “I wish you would understand the important things philosophers must do to perverse their integration of ideas and emotionally.”

    Perverse? Do you mean pursue? And what important things? Please be specific and explain in detail.

    “As Ignatius said:
    “”Remember for just one minute of the day, it would be best to try looking upon yourself more as God does, for She knows your true royal nature.”””

    Good advice. I take that as resembling Spinoza’s idea of contemplation sub specie aeternitatis, or looking at things under the aspect of eternity.

    Thanks for your feedback, Melini.

    Take care,
    Adam

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