Thought Without a Thinker: Wittgenstein and No-Agent Thinking

In the Tractacus Logico-Philosophicus, Wittgenstein writes that “there is no such thing as the subject that thinks or entertains ideas” (T. 5.631). In this passage, Wittgenstein aligns himself against the “transcendental ego” of Descartes and Kant and closer to Russell and the Buddha. As H.L. Finch writes on the subject in Wittgenstein, “thinking takes place,…

On Using the Word “I” in the Nonduality Community

Vincent Van Gogh, Self-Potrait. In the nonduality community, there is a paradoxically simultaneous aversion and attachment to the use of the word “I.”  C onsequently, some people decide not to use it at all because they are afraid of giving the impression that they believe there is a separately existing self.  This decision results in…